Breaking Records with Manomet’s 38th Annual Bird-a-Thon

Current and former banders from around North America came together to identify 399+ species during the 48 hours of this year’s Bird-a-Thon!

 

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Vitambi Springs, FL—Storm Water Treatment Area 5, a little after dawn”. Photo credit: Evan Dalton, Lead Instructor, Landbird Conservation

Manomet’s 38th Annual Bird-a-Thon consisted of 48 hours of birding delight on the weekend of September 17-18. Birding participants identified as many species as they could see or hear during that time. Supporters made (and are making) donations, and for an extra element of fun, some pledged per species; there’s a little more math involved in the latter, but we think it’s worth it. Funds raised from Bird-a-Thon benefit Manomet’s Landbird Conservation Program, which includes Climate Lab, Banding Lab, and Outreach & Education—including Family Day at the Banding Lab this coming October 15th.

 

This year’s Bird-a-Thon has not failed to impress, or we should say, our birders and supporters have not. While all the numbers aren’t in yet, it looks like we have gained in supporters, but we are still a bit shy of our $15,000 goal. IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO SUPPORT BIRD-A-THON!  Our birders really expanded their geographic range this year and we were thrilled to see many more former banders flock to participate in this quickly-growing fun-draiser.

 

Current and former banders from around North America came together to identify 399+ species during the 48 hours of this year’s Bird-a-Thon! And according to our beloved Trevor Lloyd-Evans, Director of Landbird Conservation, “There’s at least a chance of one or more species from the Ithaca region.” That would mean 400+ species…we’ll keep you posted…

 

Now, while the Banders Team obviously “wowed!” with the numbers, we were really impressed with the tenacity of Team Evan—who went to Florida, including the Everglades. Please don’t deny yourself the pleasure of reading his trip log.

 

Okemo Mountain summit, Rutland, Vermont at 6:10 AM on Saturday, September 17—Identified a Bicknell's Thrush
Photo credit: Kent McFarland, Former Bander

 

Our Trustees and Councilors Teams had their own competition going—with the winning team identifying the most species and raising the most funds. Their lists and donations are still coming in, so stay tuned for final numbers and species lists in next month’s newsletter. However, we know that individual Trustees and Councilors utilized whale watching tours and trekked out to such special locales as Monomoy Island and some hidden gems in Maine.

 

Thanks to everyone for making this year a record-breaker Bird-aThon!

 

 

2016-09-27 09:15